Archive

Where my stuff is stored.

Friday, February 6, 2015 6:16 PM Posted by Jason

Archive

My archive is where you can find some previously blogged posts and music from 2015.

Music uploaded between February 1, 2015 and July 31, 2015

February, 2015
March, 2015
April, 2015
May, 2015
June, 2015
July, 2015
Pictures - February 6, 2015
Pete Carroll's Final Super Bowl XLIX Call
Pictures - February 4, 2015
Pictures - February 3, 2015
Jimmy the Groundhog bites Wisconsin mayor
Pictures - February 2, 2015

Wednesday, February 11, 2015 10:20 PM HST - Posted by Jason

My Trip to Waimea Bay, Hawaii


On Sunday, February 8, 2015, I visited the North Shore of Oahu, Hawaii and I caught waves at world famous Waimea Bay. There was a heavy surf advisory and it was awesome.

A few days before my trip, I checked the surf report and I noticed a large swell approaching Hawaii. It said the waves would be a few feet overhead and the conditions would be clean on Sunday. Even though I was going to have to ride a bus for two hours to get there, I tweeted that I wanted to catch waves on the North Shore.

The next day, while I was at a cafe, one of my friends invited me to the North Shore with him on Sunday! He said he needed to go there for work and that he was driving, he could take me and that he would be there for 5-6 hours. It was the perfect opportunity, so I jumped on it.

On Sunday, I met Evgeny at the Ala Moana shopping mall in Honolulu and we went to the North Shore. While I was waiting, I penned a poem that I haven't published yet. Evgeny is from Russia and he has a Russian accent and loves the Motherland. He sells real estate and he needed to show a $1.6 million house to some people.

As we drove together, we talked about all sorts of things from politics to the environment to religion. No topics were off limits and it was interesting to get a mature Russian perspective on Russia, the United States, the world and everything else. In fact, we saw things quite similarly and we got along famously and respected each other as adults should. He reminded me a little of my friend Sergei who was a poet in Long Beach.

When I rode the bus to the North Shore, it took two hours and it drove around the east side of Oahu. I went to Pipeline, caught waves there and camped with my bike before taking the bus back to Honolulu. However, this time I did not bring my bike, I didn't camp and we drove around the west side of the island to get there and back.



We hit a little traffic and after almost an hour we passed Waimea Bay and Evgeny dropped me off at Pupukea Beach Park around noon. He said he would meet me back there at 5:30 p.m. and he said he would not leave me and I trusted him. I brought money for the bus, just in case I needed to ride it back to Honolulu. Since I was catching waves in the ocean and I couldn't be with my belongings, I left my laptop, wallet and backpack in Honolulu. I brought my bodyboard and fins in one bag and some clothes, suntan lotion, a hat, a towel and some other items in a small bag. I also brought two gallons of water, although I drank one on the way there.



Pupukea Beach was beautiful, but it didn't look like a good place to catch waves. There were rocks there, no lifeguard was on duty and nobody was in the water. However, I noticed people at Waimea Bay as we passed it, so I walked there. It was a flat, easy 10 minute walk.

At first glance, I wasn't very impressed with the waves, but after a few minutes, larger sets rolled in. Like some of my sessions in the past, I didn't fully understand or respect the waves' power and energy until I was in the water.



Waimea Bay is a beach break and it was very big, so it was walling up with an infrequent corner. Even with an occasional corner, each ride typically ended in either getting tubed or thrashed because there was no good way to get off. They were just short rides in shallow water. The water wasn't quite as dangerously shallow as Sandy Beach, but it was still shallow.

One of my first rides resulted in me getting tossed into the sand and it jammed my right ankle. It hurt a little and felt like a sprain, but adrenaline took over and I didn't notice the pain until later. The swelling didn't affect my session, but it affected my walking later and it was a little sore and stiff for the next two days. It even eventually made my upper left calf sore for overcompensating.

This was my first session since my brief session at Pipeline last month. Before that session, I hadn't caught waves for a couple of years. Consequently, I wasn't in great wave-catching shape. I was in good overall shape though, so I was able to paddle pretty fast.



Before I got in the water, I applied some suntan lotion and locked my belongings together with a cable and combination lock. Somebody was flying a drone with a camera around me and I jokingly thought it would make a good alibi.

I didn't miss too many waves that I wanted to catch and very few waves crashed on me as I quickly paddled out. I caught juicy lefts and tasty rights.

My session was intense and it lasted about an hour. Several people caught waves around me and most of them looked like locals. I think they noticed a fierce intensity in me that was absent from most of the wave-catchers.

No fiberglass surfboards were in the water, but a couple were on the beach and I figured they belonged to people who opted not to go in. Only one surfer with a foam surfboard tried to catch waves. He wiped out hard by me, which caused me to instinctively put one hand on my head and one hand in the air, in case his board was airborne when I popped my head out of the shoulder-deep water. Even though he got tossed, his board didn't hit me. I encouraged him by saying, "Don't worry. You'll get the next one." I didn't see him catch any good waves and I got the impression that the break wasn't very friendly for surfers. Later, his buddy was friendly to me and I figured he might have heard me being nice to his friend and wanted to return the favor.

I wasn't sure which way the current was moving, so after I found a good spot to wait for waves, I found a palm tree on the shore that I was even with. It turned out that there wasn't much of a current, so I didn't have to fight to stay in position. Eventually, after I noticed where the good waves were consistently breaking, I found a telephone pole on the adjacent shore and I tried to stay around that spot.

I got tubed a few times and I was tossed over the falls a few times too. Once or twice I yelled as I flew about eight or nine feet off the wave, but I laughed a lot too. I was stoked that I didn't get hurt, but a lot of saltwater went up my nose. After I finished my session, I blew my nose about 10 times and saltwater slowly came out of it for more than 24 hours.



On the small hill by the pole I used to gauge my position was a high tower with a cross on top of it. It might have been part of a church or a lighthouse. Later, it inspired part of a poem.

After my session, I was exhausted. The waves were reaching heights of 10' and the session took a lot out of me. I asked one of the locals how big he thought it was and he said about one or two feet. I assumed he meant 1-2 feet overhead, meaning about 7-8 feet. That sounded about right and I think there were a few larger sets too.

I spread out a striped bed sheet on the sand, scrubbed on a second coat of suntan lotion and fell asleep. After I awakened from my nap, I spoke to a nice girl that was nearby. I asked her what time it was and then we talked about all sorts of things. She was from South Carolina and she was there with a military guy who was her friend from South Carolina. However, she said that she was originally from the country of Colombia. They were living in Kailua, which was on the other side of the island. I mentioned that President Obama was recently there and visited Eddie Vedder, although there were no pictures and she didn't know anything about it.

Throughout the day, the lifeguard gave several very serious warnings over the loudspeaker. He said that parents should watch their kids closely because they could drown. He wasn't kidding and although I didn't see him make any rescues, it wasn't a good day for inexperienced swimmers to enter the water.



While I was at this beach, I saw some of the most beautiful women I had ever seen. I was very impressed with the way they carried themselves and obviously took care of themselves. I always have extra respect for people who stay in fantastic shape and in a small bikini, it was obvious that they were amazing specimens. The women ranged in age from tan, local teenagers to white women in their 20s and 30s. Frankly, I was blown away, yet it didn't throw me off and I still considered them like sisters that I needed to look out for and befriend instead of lust after and use. That's just how I roll.



As I sat on the beach, I wrote poems.

Sandy Me

Amazing beauty
floated by me,
so gorgeous,
so free

She glided down
to the sea,
tan and lean,
nothing but poetry

You Know

Catching the biggest
waves of the day,
at world renowned
Waimea Bay

First, I jammed my ankle
Later, I discovered the Lord
and under the cross
I couldn't afford
to be slow

At about 5 p.m., I started walking back to the meeting spot. I wanted to get there a little early, so I didn't make Evgeny wait for me. It was a nice walk and the weather was still amazingly beautiful. Unfortunately, there were lots of stinky cars on the road.



I waited about 10 minutes at the spot and he arrived and was friendly as usual. I was fasting and I hadn't eaten anything all day, so I graciously accepted a fruit drink that he gave me. Although there was cane sugar in it, it was all natural and it tasted great. He also give me two large pomelos that I ate later. I had never eaten a pomelo, but they were juicy and yummy.

The ride back to the mall in Honolulu was uneventful, yet relaxing. The sun was setting on the west side of the island, over a large crater, and it was beautiful. We didn't hit any traffic and we made it back in about 45 minutes.

The trip couldn't have been much better or smoother and I don't think I could have asked for more. It was awesome and I hope to return soon.